A Dual Inheritance

 by Joanna Hershon

A sweeping novel of the lives of two very different men, in background and temperament, who meet as students at Harvard in the early 1960’s. Bold and outspoken Ed Cantowitz is from working class Dorchester and strives to climb the economic and social ladder. Hugh Shipley on the other hand is from a wealthy Boston family, already perched at the top of his social class, he is a budding photographer with a penchant for whisky. Their paths converge and then part as the choices each of them make take unexpected tolls on each of their lives. Love, family, tragedy and social class distinction converge in a series of twists of fate in this lush novel.ibg.common.titledetail.imageloader

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The Obituary Writer

There are two plot lines in this wonderful novel, Claire is struggling with a decision whether to leave her loveless marriage and may be carrying her lover’s child. We follow her on the day of JFK’s inauguration as she wrestles with her conscience. Vivian, an obituary writer, is waiting and searching for her lost love, who disappeared thirteen years earlier in the San Francisco earthquake of 1906.
Through telling the life story of each deceased, she honors rhem and helps herself come to terms with her own loss. The connection between these two women will change Claire’s life forever in a surprising way.
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The Edge of the Earth by Christina Schwarz

15802906 edge of the earth You’ll have to wait till April to read this one, but it is well worth the wait!

Trudy is a young woman who leaves a comfortable life with her by her parents in Wisconsin in order to marry the man she loves, not the match long expected.  She leaves everything she’s ever known  to tend a secluded lighthouse on the California coast with her new husband, whom she barely knows. They work with and for the Crawley’s, a  family who have kept the lighthouse for years.

As Trudy discovers a whole new world offered up by the sea, she becomes fascinated by the creatures that inhabit it, having been raised land-locked, it is a whole new world to explore. A beloved teacher had previously unlocked her curiosity in the natural world and she begins to draw the creatures and study them.

Slowly she discovers the secrets bound within the Crawley family, and within a dark cavern beside the sea. I loved this book, and found the exploration of natural history in the 1910’s particularly fascinating. It really rips along towards the end as a secret is revealed and the characters true natures are exposed.

 

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The Aviator’s Wife by Melanie Benjamin

13642950  Melanie Benjamin is one of my favorite author’s and one I love to recommend others to discover. Her newest, The Aviator’s Wife is even a step up from her previous work. In this work of fiction she imagines the inner (and public) life of Anne Morrow Lindbergh, the daughter of an ambassador who is swept off her feet by the dashing young aviator, Charles Lindbergh, who is at the beginning of his career. Her marriage to the difficult Lindbergh, the tragedy of their baby’s kidnapping, and her care of him at the end of his life are all chronicled in a thoughtful and poignant way. I felt as if I finally ‘knew’ Anne, and had to keep reminding myself that this is a work of fiction. Ms. Benjamin was respectful of the Lindbergh families’ privacy and due respect, while engaging us thoroughly in the inner life of an amazing woman in her own right. I thoroughly recommend this novel.

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2012 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The London Olympic Stadium is 53 meters high. This blog had about 690 visitors in 2012. If every visitor were a meter, this blog would be 13 times taller than the Olympic Stadium – not too shabby.

Click here to see the complete report.

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This Helps….

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December 16, 2012 · 8:38 am

The Black Count

BLACK-COUNT-COVER     Author Tom Reiss has introduced to the world the story of an amazing man, Alex Dumas, father of famed novelist Alexandre Dumas (Count of Monte Cristo, The Three Musketeers). This man, born to a black slave mother and a fugitive French nobleman in present-day Haiti, was briefly sold into bondage and ended up as a leading general in the French Republic post-Revolution. He was a giant of a man, famous for his amazing strength, integrity, and genteel manners. After serving under Napoleon he was captured and thrown in a dungeon, nearly forgotten by his country, inspiring his son to write The Count of Monte Cristo. I learned so much from this brilliantly written biography, did you know that our reference to ‘left’ and ‘right’ when referring to political ‘sides’ came from the Post-Revolution governmental structure of France? I sure didn’t! I could list many things that were revelations gleaned from this book, but urge all to read it and discover them for themselves!

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